How Do I Get Contraception?

 

 

You can get free emergency contraception from your GP, any sexual health clinic, local pharmacies in the Walsall area if you’re a borough resident and young people’s services across the Walsall area.

Please phone the pharmacy first to check that a registered pharmacist will be on duty when you arrive for your emergency contraception.

Click here to see which pharmacies can help you!

Coils (IUD) and implants

An intrauterine device (IUD) is a small T-shaped plastic and copper device that is inserted into the uterus (womb) and stops sperm from reaching an egg. An IUD is more than 99% effective.

The implant is a small (4cm), flexible plastic rod that is inserted in the inner, upper arm. It releases the hormone progestogen, which stops sperm from reaching an egg and prevents an egg from implanting in the womb. Most women can feel the implant, but it can’t be seen. The implant is more than 99% effective.

 

Pills, Patches and Injections

There are two types of Pill, the combined pill and the progesterone -only pill.

The combined pill contains the hormones oestrogen and progesterone, which stops ovulation (an egg releasing), thickens cervical mucus to prevent sperm reaching an egg and prevents an egg from implanting in the womb. You take the pill every day for 21 days, then stop for seven days. There are three main types of the combined pill: Monophasic, Phasic and Every Day pills.

The Progesterone only pill contains the hormone Progesterone. This pill works in the same way as the combined pill, however you take this pill continuously without a break.

The contraceptive patch is a small patch stuck on the skin that releases the hormones oestrogen and progesterone. This stops ovulation (an egg releasing), thickens cervical mucus to prevent sperm reaching an egg and prevents an egg from implanting in the womb. Each patch lasts for one week. You wear patches for three weeks, then have a week off without a patch. If used correctly, the patch is more than 98% effective.

The contraceptive injection releases the hormone progesterone, which stops sperm from reaching an egg and prevents an egg from implanting in the womb. The injection is usually given in the bottom. It is more than 99% effective.

Under 25?

If you are under the age of 25 and would like to speak to someone about sex, relationships or growing up and all that stuff, you can either text OKAY to 64446 or call 01922 270554 to speak to a Young People’s Health Adviser.